Do you have stories about Baltimore’s Confederate statues?

Letter left on the empty pedestal of the Lee Jackson Memorial in Baltimore, August 16, 2017. It reads: Dear Mayor Pugh and the City of Baltimore: 69 years ago, when I was nine years old, I was dressed up in a yellow polka dot dress and led up to the pedestal of the Lee Jackson Memorial to place a bunch of yellow roses there during the monument's dedication. Today I place roses on teh pedestal in praise of the City of Baltimore for its wise and discreet action last night in removing the statue. It was necessary, even if the TV shot of the horses moving backwards on a flatbed truck as the statue exited under the stars gave me a moment's nostalgia pang. I am proud of Baltimore today. Thank you. Onward! Clarinda Harriss, Lifelong resident of Baltimore
Letter left on the empty pedestal of the Lee Jackson Memorial in Baltimore, August 16, 2017. Photo by Lynne Parks

Mayor Catherine Pugh made the historic decision to have four Confederate statues removed from Baltimore’s public spaces last night. Many, such as Baltimore Heritage, have convened tours and discussions about the statues, and Noise Plaque contributed their response to the Parting of Lee and Jackson statue in Wyman Park to the #BhereBmore project last year. We’d like to hear your stories: how have you experienced the statues and their removal? Please tag your thoughts on social media with the hashtag #BhereBmore.

What do you think people today and future generations need to know about this moment in Baltimore’s history and culture?

Here is a handy timeline of Confederate monuments and memory in Baltimore compiled by Eli Pousson.

If you tag your posts, recordings and photos #BhereBmore, we’ll make a Storify of what you share. Here are some of the tools and platforms we use regularly: https://www.museweb.us/platforms-for-storytellers/

Please note that hate speech and racist comments will not be collected.

Please tag your thoughts on social media with the hashtag #BhereBmore.

Author: The Peale

The Peale is based in the first museum to be purpose-built in the United States, designed by architect Robert Cary Long Sr. and opened by artist Rembrandt Peale in 1814. It is a building of many firsts, and today in the creative spirit of its founder is relaunching as an innovative Center to celebrate the unique history of Baltimore, its people and their buildings through the authentic stories of the City. Currently under renovation, the Peale is open for special events and occasional tours.

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